Нарисовать плакат соблюдения правил безопасности в автомобиле

 

Our Miss Brooks: Accused of Professionalism / Spring Garden / Taxi Fare / Marriage by Proxy

Our Miss Brooks: Accused of Professionalism / Spring Garden / Taxi Fare / Marriage by Proxy Our Miss Brooks is an American situationedy starring Eve Arden as a sardonic high school Eish teacher. It began as a radio show broadcast from 1948 to 1957. When the show was adapted to television (1952--56), it became one of the mediums earliest hits. In 1956, the si was adapted for big screen in the film of the same name.

Connie (Constance) Brooks (Eve Arden), an Eish teacher at fictional Madison High School.
Osgood Conklin (Gale Gordon), blustery, ff, crooked and unsympathetic Madison High principal, a near-constant pain to his faculty and students. (Conklin was played by Joseph Forte in the shows first episode; Gordon succeeded him for the rest of the seriesn.) Occasionally Conklin would rigpetitions at the school--such as that for prom queen--so that his daughter Harriet would win.
Walter Denton (Richard Crenna, billed at the time as Dick Crenna), a Madison High student, well-intentioned and clumsy, with a nasally high, cracking voice, often driving Miss Brooks (his self-professed favorite teacher) to school in a broken-down jalopy. Miss Brooks references to her own usually-in-the-shop car became one of the showsnning gags.
Philip Boynton (Jeff Chandler on radio, billed sometimes under his birth name Ira Grossel); Robert Rockwell on both radio and television), Madison High biology teacher, the shy and often clueless object of Miss Brooks affections.
Margaret Davis (Jane Morgan), Miss Brooks absentminded landlady, whose two trademarks are a cat named Minerva, and a penchant for whipping up exotic and often inedible breakfasts.
Harriet Conklin (Gloria McMillan), Madison High student and daughter of principal Conklin. A sometime love interest for Walter Denton, Harriet was honest and guileless with none of her fathers malevolence and dishonesty.
Stretch (Fabian) Snodgrass (Leonard Smith), dull-witted Madison High athletic star and Walters best friend.
Daisy Enright (Mary Jane Croft), Madison High Eish teacher, and a scheming professional and romantic rival to Miss Brooks.
Jacques M (Gerald Mohr), a French teacher.

Our Miss Brooks was a hit on radio from the outset; within eight months of its launch as a regular series, the show landed several honors, including four for Eve Arden, who won polls in four individual publications of the time. Arden had actually been the third choice to play the title role. Harry Ackerman, West Coast director of programming, wanted Shirley Booth for the part, but as he told historian Gerald Nachman many years later, he realized Booth was too focused on the underpaid downside of public school teaching at the time to have fun with the role.

Lucille Ball was believed to have been the next choice, but she was alreadymitted to My Favorite Husband and didnt audition. Chairman Bill Paley, who was friendly with Arden, persuaded her to audition for the part. With a slightly rewritten audition script--Osgood Conklin, for example, was originally written as a school board president but was now written as the iing new Madison principal--Arden agreed to give the newly-revamped show a try.

Produced by Larry Berns and written by director Al Lewis, Our Miss Brooks premiered on July 19, 1948. According to radio critic John Crosby, her lines were very feline in dialogue scenes with principal Conklin and would-be boyfriend Boynton, with sharp, wittyebacks. The interplay between the cast--blustery Conklin, nebbishy Denton, amodating Harriet, absentminded Mrs. Davis, clueless Boynton, scheming Miss Enright--also received positive reviews.

Arden won a radio listeners poll by Radio Mirror magazine as the top rankingedienne of 1948-49, receiving her award at the end of an Our Miss Brooks broadcast that March. Im certainly going to try in theing months to merit the honor youve bestowed upon me, because I understand that if I win this two years in a row, I get to keep Mr. Boynton, she joked. But she was also a hit with the critics; a winter 1949 poll of newspaper and magazine radio editors taken by Motion Picture Daily named her the years best radioedienne.

For its entire radio life, the show was sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, promoting Palmolive soap, Lustre Creme shampoo and Toni hair care products. The radio series continued until 1957, a year after its television life ended.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Miss_Brooks

Calling All Cars: History of Dallas Eagan / Homicidal Hobo / The Drunken Sailor

Calling All Cars: History of Dallas Eagan / Homicidal Hobo / The Drunken Sailor The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role.

The iconic television series Dra, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station.

Due to Dras popularity, LAPD Chief Parker became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation. In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded itsmunity relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-Americanmunity, Dra followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs andmunity policing than solving crimes, the shows previous mainstay.

Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel.

The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPDs most famous cold case, and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and coption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the films characters (from the 1950s) represent the choices ahead for the LAPD: assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a straight arrow approach.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD

Our Miss Brooks: Connie the Work Horse / Babysitting for Three / Model School Teacher

Our Miss Brooks: Connie the Work Horse / Babysitting for Three / Model School Teacher Our Miss Brooks is an American situationedy starring Eve Arden as a sardonic high school Eish teacher. It began as a radio show broadcast from 1948 to 1957. When the show was adapted to television (1952--56), it became one of the mediums earliest hits. In 1956, the si was adapted for big screen in the film of the same name.

Connie (Constance) Brooks (Eve Arden), an Eish teacher at fictional Madison High School.
Osgood Conklin (Gale Gordon), blustery, ff, crooked and unsympathetic Madison High principal, a near-constant pain to his faculty and students. (Conklin was played by Joseph Forte in the shows first episode; Gordon succeeded him for the rest of the seriesn.) Occasionally Conklin would rigpetitions at the school--such as that for prom queen--so that his daughter Harriet would win.
Walter Denton (Richard Crenna, billed at the time as Dick Crenna), a Madison High student, well-intentioned and clumsy, with a nasally high, cracking voice, often driving Miss Brooks (his self-professed favorite teacher) to school in a broken-down jalopy. Miss Brooks references to her own usually-in-the-shop car became one of the showsnning gags.
Philip Boynton (Jeff Chandler on radio, billed sometimes under his birth name Ira Grossel); Robert Rockwell on both radio and television), Madison High biology teacher, the shy and often clueless object of Miss Brooks affections.
Margaret Davis (Jane Morgan), Miss Brooks absentminded landlady, whose two trademarks are a cat named Minerva, and a penchant for whipping up exotic and often inedible breakfasts.
Harriet Conklin (Gloria McMillan), Madison High student and daughter of principal Conklin. A sometime love interest for Walter Denton, Harriet was honest and guileless with none of her fathers malevolence and dishonesty.
Stretch (Fabian) Snodgrass (Leonard Smith), dull-witted Madison High athletic star and Walters best friend.
Daisy Enright (Mary Jane Croft), Madison High Eish teacher, and a scheming professional and romantic rival to Miss Brooks.
Jacques M (Gerald Mohr), a French teacher.

Our Miss Brooks was a hit on radio from the outset; within eight months of its launch as a regular series, the show landed several honors, including four for Eve Arden, who won polls in four individual publications of the time. Arden had actually been the third choice to play the title role. Harry Ackerman, West Coast director of programming, wanted Shirley Booth for the part, but as he told historian Gerald Nachman many years later, he realized Booth was too focused on the underpaid downside of public school teaching at the time to have fun with the role.

Lucille Ball was believed to have been the next choice, but she was alreadymitted to My Favorite Husband and didnt audition. Chairman Bill Paley, who was friendly with Arden, persuaded her to audition for the part. With a slightly rewritten audition script--Osgood Conklin, for example, was originally written as a school board president but was now written as the iing new Madison principal--Arden agreed to give the newly-revamped show a try.

Produced by Larry Berns and written by director Al Lewis, Our Miss Brooks premiered on July 19, 1948. According to radio critic John Crosby, her lines were very feline in dialogue scenes with principal Conklin and would-be boyfriend Boynton, with sharp, wittyebacks. The interplay between the cast--blustery Conklin, nebbishy Denton, amodating Harriet, absentminded Mrs. Davis, clueless Boynton, scheming Miss Enright--also received positive reviews.

Arden won a radio listeners poll by Radio Mirror magazine as the top rankingedienne of 1948-49, receiving her award at the end of an Our Miss Brooks broadcast that March. Im certainly going to try in theing months to merit the honor youve bestowed upon me, because I understand that if I win this two years in a row, I get to keep Mr. Boynton, she joked. But she was also a hit with the critics; a winter 1949 poll of newspaper and magazine radio editors taken by Motion Picture Daily named her the years best radioedienne.

For its entire radio life, the show was sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, promoting Palmolive soap, Lustre Creme shampoo and Toni hair care products. The radio series continued until 1957, a year after its television life ended.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Miss_Brooks

Part 06 - Our Mutual Friend Audiobook by Charles Dickens (Book 2, Chs 5-8)

Part 06 - Our Mutual Friend Audiobook by Charles Dickens (Book 2, Chs 5-8) Part 06 (Book 2, Chs 5-8). Classic Literature VideoBook with synchronized text, interactive transcript, and closed captions in multiple languages. Audio courtesy of Librivox. Read by Mil Nicholson.

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Смешарики По дороге со Смешариками 3 часть

Смешарики  По дороге со Смешариками 3 часть Игра По дороге со Смешариками -- это веселый интерактивный мультфильм-учебник по правилам дорожного движения для малышей. Смешарики получили приглашение на съемки телепередачи. Но как добраться до студии? Ведь в городе так много дорог, машин и светофоров И кроме того, оказывается, есть специальные правила дорожного движения. Смешарикам предстоит их изучить. Гуляя по городу с персонажами любимого мультсериала, ребята узнают, что означают сигналы светофора, изучат виды городского транспорта, дорожные знаки и правила перехода через улицу. Каждый урок сопровождается мини-игрой, в которой ребенок закрепляет полученные знания и учится применять их на практике. В конце игры на телестудии Смешариков и игроков ожидает шоу-викторина. Отвечая на вопросы по пройденному за время игры материалу, малыши еще раз повторят основные правила дорожного движения и получат Сертификат знатока.

Part 2 - The Jungle Audiobook by Upton Sinclair (Chs 04-07)

Part 2 - The Jungle Audiobook by Upton Sinclair (Chs 04-07) Part 2 (Chs 04-07). Classic Literature VideoBook with synchronized text, interactive transcript, and closed captions in multiple languages. Audio courtesy of Librivox. Read by Tom Weiss.

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The Enormous Radio / Lovers, Villains and Fools / The Little Prince

The Enormous Radio / Lovers, Villains and Fools / The Little Prince The Enormous Radio is a short story written by John Cheever in 1947. It first appeared in the May 17, 1947 issue of The New Yorker and was later collected in The Enormous Radio and Other Stories. The story deals with a family who purchases a new radio that allows them to listen in on conversations and arguments of other tenants living in their apartment building.

According to Alan Lloyd Smith, author of American Gothic Fiction - An Introduction ISBN 0-8264-1595-4, a concept of domestic abjection is one that disturbs identity, order, and system. This is exactly what the new radio did in the Westcott household. When Mrs. Westcott saw the new radio in the large gumwood cab, she did not like the enormousness of it. The Gumwood cab is a dark cab and did not fit in with the living room furnishings and colors that Irene had personally chosen. This cab is dark and y, bringing darkness into the living room and their lives. Eventually, Irene identifies herself with the object.

Another gothic concept of The Enormous Radio is the element of buried secrets. Both Jim and Irene begin to recognize that there is tension in their marriage. Irene had many deep dark secrets that she feels guilty about. She has successfully hidden these secrets all these years until the iness of the radio brings up her neighbors problems. Irene has suppressed and hidden her feelings to others and herself for a long time. This is the reason she is drawn to the radio, it exposes the inner life of others and eventually hers. Irene identified with the others in the building as her own problems. It is ironic that the thing purchased to bring joy to the Westcotts life did nothing but cause trouble between them. Secrets revealed are sometimes not able to be handled well.

Alan Lloyd Smith also identifies Domestic Gothic as,[2] intimately bound up with the idea of the house, gender, and family, which bes through metaphor, a way of externalizing the inner life of fictional characters.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_enormous_radio

Пожарная безопасность в школе , д

Пожарная безопасность в школе , д Материал из видеотеки социальной сети работников образования nsportal.

Занятия на пожарную тематику поведены МЧС ЮВАО г. Москвы в городском школьном лагере ГОУ СОШ 1040 и они воспитали у учащихся чувство ответственности за сохранность общественной собственности, научили их осторожности при пользовании огнем, электрическими приборами, средствами бытовой химии и т.д.
Каждый воспитанник лагеря нарисовал плакат о пожарной безопасности в школе, дома, на природе.

Вот какие правила по пожарной безопасности в школе усвоили воспитанники школьного летнего лагеря ГОУ СОШ 1040:

Part 3 - The War of the Worlds Audiobook by H. G. Wells (Book 2 - Chs 1-10)

Part 3 - The War of the Worlds Audiobook by H. G. Wells (Book 2 - Chs 1-10) Part 3 (Book 2 - Chs 1-10). Classic Literature VideoBook with synchronized text, interactive transcript, and closed captions in multiple languages. Audio courtesy of Librivox. Read by Rebecca Dittman: mercurialspirit.co.uk/

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Words at War: Assignment USA / The Weeping Wood / Science at War

Words at War: Assignment USA / The Weeping Wood / Science at War The Detroit Race Riot broke out in Detroit, Michigan in June 20, 1943, and lasted for three days before Federal troops restored order. The rioting between blacks and whites began on Belle Isle on June 20, 1943 and continued until the 22nd of June, killing 34, wounding 433, and destroying property valued at 2 million.

In the summer of 1943, in the midst of World War II, tensions between blacks and whites in Detroit were escalating. Detroits population had grown by 350,000 people since the war began. The booming defense industries brought in large numbers of people with high wages and very little available housing. 50,000 blacks had recently arrived along with 300,000 whites, mostly fromral Appalachia and Southern States.[2]

Reiters convinced blacks as well as whites in the South toe up North by promising them higher wages in the new war factories. Believing that they had found a promised land, blacks began to move up North in larger numbers. However, upon arriving in Detroit, blacks found that the northern bigotry was just as bad as that they left behind in the deep South. They were excluded from all public housing except Brewster Housing Projects, forced to live in homes without indoor plumbing, and paid rents two to three times higher than families in white districts. They also faced discrimination from the public and unfair treatment by the Detroit Police Department.[3] In addition, Southern whites brought their traditional bigotry with them as both races head up North, adding serious racial tensions to the area. Job-seekers arrived in such large numbers in Detroit that it was impossible to house them all.

Before the attack on Pearl Harbor, the U.S. government was concerned about providing housing for the workers who were beginning to pour into the area. On June 4, 1941, the Detroit Housing Commission approved two sites for defense housing projects--one for whites, one for blacks. The site originally selected by themission for black workers was in a predominantly black area, but the U.S. government chose a site at Nevada and Fenelon streets, an all-white neighborhood.

Toplete this, a project named Sojourner th was launched in the memory of a black Civil War woman and poet. Despite this, the white neighborhoods opposed having blacks moving next to their homes, meaning no tenants were to be built. On January, 20, 1942, Washington DC informed the Housing Commission that the Sojourner th project would be for whites and another would be selected for blacks. But when a suitable site for blacks could not be found, Washington housing authorities agreed to allow blacks into the finished homes. This was set on Feary 28, 1942.[4] In Feary 27, 1942, 120 whites went on protest vowing they would keep any black homeowners out of their sight in response to the project. By the end of the day, it had grown to more than 1,200, most of them were armed. Things went so badly that two blacks in a car attempted ton over the protesters picket line which led to a clash between white and black groups. Despite the mounting opposition from whites, black families moved into the project at the end of April. To prevent a riot, Detroit Mayor Edward Jeffries ordered the Detroit Police Department and state troops to keep the peace during that move. Over 1,100 city and state police officers and 1,600 Michigan National Guard troops were mobilized and sent to the area around Nevada and Fenelon street to guard six African-American families who moved into the Sojourner th Homes. Thanks to the presence of the guard, there were no further racial problems for the blacks who moved into this federal housing project. Eventually, 168 black families moved into these homes.[5] Despite no casualties in the project, the fear was about to explode a year later.[6]

In early June 1943, three weeks before the riot, Packard Motor Car Company promoted three blacks to work next to whites in the assembly lines. This promotion caused 25,000 whites to walk off the job, effectively slowing down the critical war production. It was clear that whites didnt mind that blacks worked in the same plant but refused to work side-by-side with them. During the protest, a voice with a Southern accent shouted in the loudspeaker, Id rather see Hitler and Hirohito win than work next to a nigger.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Detroit_Race_Riot_%281943%29

Words at War: White Brigade / George Washington Carver / The New Sun

Words at War: White Brigade / George Washington Carver / The New Sun George Washington Carver (January 1864 -- January 5, 1943), was an American scientist, botanist, educator, and inventor. The exact day and year of his birth are unknown; he is believed to have been born into slavery in Missouri in January 1864.

Carvers reputation is based on his research into and promotion of alternative crops to cotton, such as peanuts, soybeans and sweet potatoes, which also aided nutrition for farm families. He wanted poor farmers to grow alternative crops both as a source of their own food and as a source of other products to improve their quality of life. The most popular of his 44 practical bulletins for farmers contained 105 food recipes using peanuts.[3] He also developed and promoted about 100 products made from peanuts that were useful for the house and farm, including cosmetics, dyes, paints, plastics, gasoline, and nitrycerin. He received numerous honors for his work, including the Spingarn Medal of the NAACP.

During the Reconsction-era South, monoculture of cotton depleted the soil in many areas. In the early 20th century, the boll weevil destroyed much of the cotton crop, and planters and farm workers suffered. Carvers work on peanuts was intended to provide an alternative crop.

He was recognized for his many achievements and talents. In 1941, Time magazine dubbed Carver a Black Leonardo.[4]

George Washington Carver reputedly discovered three hundred uses for peanuts and hundreds more for soybeans, pecans and sweet potatoes. Among the listed items that he suggested to southern farmers to help them economically were adhesives, axle grease, bleach, buttermilk, chili sauce, fuel briquettes (a biofuel), ink, instant coffee, linoleum, mayonnaise, meat tenderizer, metal polish, paper, plastic, pavement, shaving cream, shoe polish, syntheticbber, talcum powder and wood stain. Three patents (one for cosmetics; patent number 1,522,176, and two for paints and stains; patent numbers 1,541,478 and 1,632,365) were issued to George Washington Carver in the years 1925 to 1927; however, they were notmercially successful.[40] Aside from these patents and some recipes for food, Carver left no records of formulae or procedures for making his products.[41] He did not keep a laboratory notebook.

Carvers research was intended to provide replacements formercial products, which were generally beyond the budget of the small one-horse farmer. A misconception grew that his research on products for subsistence farmers were developed by othersmercially to change Southern agriculture.[42][43] Carvers work to provide them with resources for more independence from the cash economy foreshadowed the appropriate technology work of E.F. Schumacher.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_washington_carver

Words at War: Combined Operations / They Call It Pacific / The Last Days of Sevastopol

Words at War: Combined Operations / They Call It Pacific / The Last Days of Sevastopol The Siege of Sevastopol took place on the Eastern Front of the Second World War. The campaign was fought by the Axis powers of Germany, Romania and Italy against the Soviet Union for control of Sevastopol, a port in Crimea on the Black Sea. On 22 June 1941 the Axis invaded the Soviet Union under Operation Barbarossa. The Axis land forces reached Crimea in the autumn, 1941, and overran the area. The only objective not in Axis hands was Sevastopol. Several attempts were made to secure the city in October and November 1941. A major attack was planned for late November, but bad weather and heavy rains delayed the Axis attack until 17 December 1941. Under themand of Erich von Manstein, the Axis forces were unable to capture Sevastopol in the first stage of operations. The Soviets launched an amphibious landing on the Crimean peninsula at Kerch in December 1941, to relieve the siege and force the Axis to divert forces to defend their gains. The operation saved Sevastopol for the time being, but the landing was checked and repulsed in May 1942.

At Sevastopol the Axis opted to conduct a siege until the summer, 1942, at which point they attacked the encircled Soviet forces by land, sea and air. On 2 June 1942, the Axis began their operation, codenamed Strfang (Sturgeon Catch). The Soviet Red Army and Black Sea Fleet held out for weeks under intense Axis bombardment. The German Air Force (Luftwaffe) played a vital part in the siege. The Luftwaffe made up for a shortage of Axis artillery, providing highly effective aerial bombardment in support of the ground forces. Finally, on the 4 July 1942, the remaining Soviet forces surrendered and the Axis seized the port. Both sides had suffered considerable losses during the siege.

With the Soviet forces neutralised, the Axis refocused their attention on the major summer campaign of that year, Operation Blue and the advance to the Caucasus oil fields.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siege_of_Sevastopol_%281941%E2%80%931942%29

Suspense: Murder for Myra / Short Order / This Will Kill You

Suspense: Murder for Myra / Short Order / This Will Kill You One of the premier drama programs of the Golden Age of Radio, was subtitled radios outstanding theater of thrills and focused on suspense thriller-type scripts, usually featuring leading Hollywood actors of the era. Approximately 945 episodes were broadcast during its longn, and more than 900 are extant.

Suspense went through several major phases, characterized by different hosts, sponsors, and director/producers. Formula plot devices were followed for all but a handful of episodes: the protagonist was usually a normal person suddenly dropped into a threatening or bizarre situation; solutions were withheld until the last possible second; and evildoers were usually punished in the end.

In its early years, the program made only occasional forays into science fiction and fantasy. Notable exceptions include adaptations of Curt Siodmaks Donovans Brain and H. P. Lovecrafts The Dunwich Horror, but by the late 1950s, such material was regularly featured.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suspense_%28radio_drama%29

Part 09 - Our Mutual Friend Audiobook by Charles Dickens (Book 3, Chs 1-5)

Part 09 - Our Mutual Friend Audiobook by Charles Dickens (Book 3, Chs 1-5) Part 09 (Book 3, Chs 1-5). Classic Literature VideoBook with synchronized text, interactive transcript, and closed captions in multiple languages. Audio courtesy of Librivox. Read by Mil Nicholson.

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Part 7 - Tess of the d'Urbervilles Audiobook by Thomas Hardy (Chs 45-50)

Part 7 - Tess of the d'Urbervilles Audiobook by Thomas Hardy (Chs 45-50) Part 7. Classic Literature VideoBook with synchronized text, interactive transcript, and closed captions in multiple languages. Audio courtesy of Librivox. Read by Adrian Praetzellis.

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Акция - Пристегнись и улыбнись! 28 июня 2013 года. с.Песчанокопское

Акция - Пристегнись   и улыбнись! 28 июня 2013 года. с.Песчанокопское В пятницу на прошедшей неделе многие города и поселки Ростовской области присоединились к Всероссийской акции Детская Россия пристегивается. Мероприятие было посвящено 40летию отрядов ЮИД (юных инспекторов движения) и 77й годовщине Госавтоинспекции.
В этой акции, организованной отделом образования, Центром внешкольной работы и ОГИБДД по Песчанокопскому району, приняли участие и юные инспектора движения, и просто ребята, пожелавшие напомнить взрослым о том, что надо уважать закон и обязательно, сев за руль, пристегнуться ремнем безопасности самому и позаботиться об удерживающем устройстве для юных пассажиров. Символ акции Всероссийский дорожный смайлик с призывом: Пристегнись и улыбнись.
В рамках мероприятия ребята провели танцевальный флешмоб, разбившись на группы, рисовали мелом на асфальте свой вариант дорожного смайлика. А придуманные ими речевки запросто могут стать девизом подобных акций: Сев в машину, пристегнись. Безопасность это жизнь, Жизнь в опасности, если водитель без ремня безопасности и др.
А затем ребята вместе с начальником ОГИБДД Владимиром Фастовым и инспектором по пропаганде Денисом Фадеевым отправились раздавать водителям смайлики, которые, между прочим, как и яркий плакат с девизом акции, сделали своими руками.
Инспекторы останавливали те автомобили, водители которых ехали, пренебрегая ремнем безопасности. Увы, хочу отметить, таковых на улицах райцентра было немало. Ктото из водителей, завидев инспекторов, хотя бы судорожно пытался пристегнуться. Но были и такие, кто никак не реагировал на присутствие полицейских. Вероятнее всего, они привыкли так себя вести на дороге... Жаль, что среди них были те, кто, собственно, должен даже по статусу соблюдать Правила, показывая пример остальным...
В этот день сотрудники ГИБДД никого не наказывали, а вместе с участниками акции напоминали о том, что водителям необходимо неукоснительно соблюдать Правила дорожного движения. Дети с разрешения водителей прикрепляли на автомобиль в качестве напоминания веселый смайлик с надписью Пристегнись и улыбнись.
Ребята также нарисовали смайлики с девизом Детская Россия пристегивается у детского сада Березка, ПСШ 1, главного здания почты и сбербанка.
Наталья АЛФИМОВА.

The Great Gildersleeve: Leroy's Toothache / New Man in Water Dept. / Adeline's Hat Shop

The Great Gildersleeve: Leroy's Toothache / New Man in Water Dept. / Adeline's Hat Shop Premiering on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGees Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late brother-in-laws estate and took on the rearing of his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lurene Tuttle and followed by Louise Erickson and Mary Lee Robb) and Leroy Forester (Walter Tetley). The household also included a cook named Birdie. Curiously, while Gildersleeve had occasionally spoken of his (never-present) wife in some Fibber episodes, in his own series the character was a confirmed bachelor.

In a striking fornner to such later television hits as Bachelor Father and Family Affair, both of which are centered on well-to-do uncles taking in their deceased siblings children, Gildersleeve was a bachelor raising two children while, at first, administering a girdle manufacturingpany (If you want a better corset, of course, its a Gildersleeve) and then for the bulk of the showsn, serving as Summerfields watermissioner, between time with the ladies and nights with the boys. The Great Gildersleeve may have been the first broadcast show to be centered on a sie parent balancing child-rearing, work, and a social life, done with taste and genuine wit, often at the expense of Gildersleeves now slightly understated pomposity.

Many of the original episodes were co-written by John Whedon, father of Tom Whedon (who wrote The Golden Girls), and grandfather of Deadwood scripter Zack Whedon and Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly and Dr. Horribles Sing-Along Blog).

The key to the show was Peary, whose booming voice and facility with moans, groans, laughs, shudders and inflection was as close to body language and facial suggestion as a voice could get. Peary was so effective, and Gildersleeve became so familiar a character, that he was referenced and satirized periodically in otheredies and in a few cartoons.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Great_Gildersleeve

Book 2, Chapter 08 - Our Mutual Friend by Charles Dickens - In Which an Innocent Elopement Occurs

Book 2, Chapter 08 - Our Mutual Friend by Charles Dickens - In Which an Innocent Elopement Occurs Book 2, Chapter 8: In Which an Innocent Elopement Occurs. Classic Literature VideoBook with synchronized text, interactive transcript, and closed captions in multiple languages. Audio courtesy of Librivox. Read by Mil Nicholson.

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Adventure 05 - The Return of Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Adventure 05 - The Return of Sherlock Holmes by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle 05: The Adventure of The Priory School. Classic Literature VideoBook with synchronized text, interactive transcript, and closed captions in multiple languages. Audio courtesy of Librivox. Read by Vivian Bush.

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